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University of Maryland School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures Home

Summer Language Institute

Applications are open for Arabic, Korean and Persian institutes this summer. Early bird deadline is March 15th. The Summer Language Institute (SLI) provides a full year of language instruction in just nine weeks.

Read More about Summer Language Institutes in Arabic, Korean and Persian

The Language House Living and Learning Program

‘Hidden Gem’ Offers Immersive Oasis for Learning More Than ‘Hola’ and ‘Ni Hao’. Applications for Fall 2023 are due March 3rd.

Read More about What It Takes: The Language House

Faculty chosen for TLTC initiative to “Reimagine learning” as part of the new UMD Strategic Plan.

Courses will be redesigned to incorporate experiential learning components in language and culture.

Read More about SLLC Faculty awarded funding to “Reimagine Learning”

Welcome to the School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures in the College of Arts and Humanities at the University of Maryland, College Park.

The School is a transdisciplinary teaching and research unit. Our students, faculty, and staff investigate and engage with the linguistic, cultural, cinematic, and literary worlds of speakers of ArabicChinese, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, JapaneseKorean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish, as well as questions surrounding Second Language Acquisition and Cinema and Media Studies.

We invite you to learn more about our undergraduate and graduate degrees, our fields of study, and special programs like the Language House Living and Learning Program, the Language Partner Program, the Persian Flagship and Arabic Flagship Programs, Project GO, and the Summer Language Institutes.

Explore Languages, Literatures, and Cultures at UMD

Degrees

Undergraduate and Graduate Degrees

The School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures offers numerous undergraduate and graduate degrees in 12 languages and 16 different fields.


Fields

Fields of Study

Faculty, students and staff investigate and engage with numerous languages and fields, often through interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research and study.


Special Programs

Special Programs

SLLC offers several special language-learning programs, including the Arabic and Persian Language Flagships, the Summer Institute and the Language House Living and Learning Program.


Centers

Centers

The school is home to two centers, Roshan Center for Persian Studies, a landmark institution for the promotion of Persian language and culture, and the Center for East Asian Studies, which promotes the study and appreciation of East Asian cultures by offering a wide range of scholarly, artistic and community programs.


People

Faculty, Staff and Graduate Students

Search our directory to learn about our faculty, staff, and graduate students.

FACULTY, STAFF AND GRAD STUDENTS

Scrutinizing LLAMA D as a measure of implicit learning aptitude

In this study, we tested the hypothesis that researchers’ variable test instructions are the source of the inconsistent results.

Second Language Acquisition

Author/Lead: Takehiro Iizuka, Robert M. DeKeyser
Dates:

Since Gisela Granena’s influential work, LLAMA D v2, a sound recognition subtest of LLAMA aptitude tests, has been used as a measure of implicit learning aptitude in second language acquisition research. The validity of this test, however, is little known and the results of studies with this instrument have been somewhat inconsistent. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that researchers’ variable test instructions are the source of the inconsistent results. One hundred fourteen English monolinguals were randomly assigned to take LLAMA D v2 under one of three test instruction conditions. They also completed two implicit aptitude tests, three explicit aptitude tests, and a sound discrimination test. The results showed that, regardless of the type of test instructions, LLAMA D scores did not align with implicit aptitude test scores, indicating no clear evidence of the test being implicit. On the contrary, LLAMA D scores were negatively associated with scores on one implicit aptitude test, the Serial Reaction Time (SRT) task, but only in the condition where the instructions drew participants’ focal attention to the stimuli. This negative association was interpreted as focal attention working against learning in the SRT task. Implicit learning aptitude may be the degree to which one is able to process input without focal attention.

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Structure. Concepts, Consequences, Interactions

Natural phenomena, including human language, are not just series of events but are organized quasi-periodically; sentences have structure, and that structure matters.

School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, Linguistics

Author/Lead: Juan Uriagereka
Dates:
book cover for Structure - Concepts, Consequences, Interactions

Howard Lasnik and Juan Uriagereka “were there” when generative grammar was being developed into the Minimalist Program. In this presentation of the universal aspects of human language as a cognitive phenomenon, they rationally reconstruct syntactic structure. In the process, they touch upon structure dependency and its consequences for learnability, nuanced arguments (including global ones) for structure presupposed in standard linguistic analyses, and a formalism to capture long-range correlations. For practitioners, the authors assess whether “all we need is Merge,” while for outsiders, they summarize what needs to be covered when attempting to have structure “emerge.”

Reconstructing the essential history of what is at stake when arguing for sentence scaffolding, the authors cover a range of larger issues, from the traditional computational notion of structure (the strong generative capacity of a system) and how far down into words it reaches, to whether its variants, as evident across the world's languages, can arise from non-generative systems. While their perspective stems from Noam Chomsky's work, it does so critically, separating rhetoric from results. They consider what they do to be empirical, with the formalism being only a tool to guide their research (of course, they want sharp tools that can be falsified and have predictive power). Reaching out to sceptics, they invite potential collaborations that could arise from mutual examination of one another's work, as they attempt to establish a dialogue beyond generative grammar.

Read More about Structure. Concepts, Consequences, Interactions

« L’horrible vrai » des Contes bruns de Balzac

« L'horrible vrai est toujours plus horrible encore ! » s'exclame un personnage d'Une conversation entre onze heures et minuit – conte saturé de violence que Balzac intègre, avec Le Grand d'Espagne, au recueil collectif des Contes bruns, composé à la fave

School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, French

Author/Lead: Maria Beliaeva Solomon
Dates:

« L'horrible vrai est toujours plus horrible encore ! » s'exclame un personnage d'Une conversation entre onze heures et minuit – conte saturé de violence que Balzac intègre, avec Le Grand d'Espagne, au recueil collectif des Contes bruns, composé à la faveur de la mode frénétique et horrifiante. Ces textes, qui ironisent sur les lois de la littérature marchande tout en y acquiesçant, apportent un éclairage essentiel sur les questionnements que l'écriture balzacienne émet sur elle-même, alors que Balzac s'apprête à abandonner la forme du conte pour le projet, expansif et totalisant, d'une œuvre représentative de la société moderne.

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Choose the SLLC

Land Acknowledgement

Every community owes its existence and strength to the generations before them, around the world, who contributed their hopes, dreams, and energy into making the history that led to this moment.

Truth and acknowledgement are critical in building mutual respect and connections across all barriers of heritage and difference.

So, we acknowledge the truth that is often buried: We are on the ancestral lands of the Piscataway People, who are the ancestral stewards of this sacred land. It is their historical responsibility to advocate for the four-legged, the winged, those that crawl and those that swim. They remind us that clean air and pristine waterways are essential to all life.

This Land Acknowledgement is a vocal reminder for each of us as two-leggeds to ensure our physical environment is in better condition than what we inherited, for the health and prosperity of future generations.

Office of Diversity and Inclusion