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Thayse Leal Lima

Assistant Professor, School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures
Assistant Professor, Advisor, Spanish and Portuguese

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Research Expertise

Brazil
Latin America
Transnational Studies

Curriculum Vitae

Thayse Leal Lima earned her PhD in Portuguese and Brazilian Studies from Brown University in 2014. Her areas of specialization include nineteenth century to contemporary Brazilian literature and culture, Modern Latin American literature and intellectual history, transnationalism and international literary circulation.  Her book, Latino Americanizando o Brasil: Trocas Intelectuais e a Integração do Brasil na América Latina [Latin Americanizing Brazil: Intellectual Exchanges and the Integration of Brazil in Latin America] is forthcoming through Editora UFPR (Federal University of Paraná Press). The manuscript traces the dialogues between Hispanic American and Brazilian cultural and literary critics during the second half of the twentieth century, focusing on their efforts to integrate the two distinct Latin American literary traditions. Bringing forth new archival material that documents the infrastructure of transnational exchanges, she argues that the drive toward a continental paradigm goes beyond the ideological discourse of Latin American solidarity, relating also to politics of literary promotion, recognition and internationalization.She is currently co-editing a special issue of the Journal of Lusophone Studies on the theme of Lusophone World Literature, to be published in the Spring 2021. Her current research focuses on transnationalism and cosmopolitanism in Brazilian literature. Her articles and book reviews have appeared in journals such as Hispania, Brazil/Brasil, Letterature d’America and Portuguese Literary and Cultural Studies.

Publications

Translation and World Literature: The Perspective of the ‘Ex-Centric’

Argues that De Campos’s translation theory of “Trancreation” subverted the hierarchical categories and values that have structured the field of world literature

School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Lead: Thayse Leal Lima
Dates:
In this article I demonstrate that De Campos’s translation theory of “Trancreation” subverted the hierarchical categories and values that have structured the field of world literature. Positioning himself as an intellectual from an ‘ex-centric’ literaryculture, situated outside of the centers of global circulation, De Campos critiqued the unequal weight usually assigned to translated and original texts, author and translator, established and ascending traditions. I argue that De Campos’s response to the standing inequality that characterizes translational exchanges involved a literary solution. As a creative act in its own right, the theory of transcreation offered an aesthetic answer to the problems of authenticity, influence and literary dependence.

Journal of Latin American Cultural Studies, no. 26, 2017, pp. 461-481

South-South Exchanges: Biblioteca Ayacucho and Construction of a Transnational Literature

Addresses circulation and exchange in the Global South by examining the case of Biblioteca Ayacucho (1973), a transnational collection of over 500 books from several Latin American countries.

School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Lead: Thayse Leal Lima
Dates:
The article addresses circulation and exchange in the Global South by examining the case of Biblioteca Ayacucho (1973), a transnational collection of over 500 books from several Latin American countries. It discusses Ayacucho’ strategies of transnationalization which, in addition to book publishing, also relied on networks of intellectual collaboration and exchange. By engaging Latin American specialists and relying on local scholarship, Ayacucho offered an inclusive model of world literature that allies both distant and close reading in the construction of a transnational literature. As such, it defied established assumptions about literary circulation and center-based conceptions of world literature.

DOI: 10.1163/24056480-20210001

Latin American Dialogues during the Cold War: The magazines Cadernos Brasileiros and Mundo Nuevo

Examines the relationship between the magazines Cadernos Brasileiros (1959 - 1970) and Mundo Nuevo (1967 - 1971) in the 1960s and 70s

School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Lead: Thayse Leal Lima
Dates:

This article examines the relationship between the magazines Cadernos Brasileiros (1959 - 1970) and Mundo Nuevo (1967 - 1971) in the 1960s and 70s. It problematizes the processes of South-South exchange by examining the triangulation of Brazilian and Hispanic American cultural relations, which in the case studied, relied on material and logistical support of the United States. If on the one hand the support of the United states undermined the credibility of Latin American cultural magazines, on the other hand, it also opened opportunities for editors, cultural producers, and writers to advance their own agenda of literary internationalization and the cultural integration of Latin America.

Thinking World Literature from Lusophone Perspectives, special issue of Journal of Lusophone Studies, 2021. (accepted)

Latino-Americanizando o Brasil:A Crítica Literária e o Diálogo Transnacional [Latin Americanizing Brazil: Literary Critics and the Transnational Dialogue]

Examines the dialogues and exchanges between Brazilian and Hispanic American literary critics from the 1960s to the 1980s and their efforts to integrate Brazil in the Latin American paradigm.

School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Lead: Thayse Leal Lima
The book Latino-Americanizando o Brasil: A Crítica Literária e o Diálogo Transnacional focuses on the dialogues and exchanges between Brazilian and Hispanic American literary critics from the 1960s to the 1980s and their efforts to integrate Brazil in the Latin American paradigm. It shows how these engagements helped to rethink national and transnational cultural constructs producing a revision of the Hispanic-centered definition of Latin American literature and a shift in the Brazilian literary and cultural theory from a nationally based perspective to a transnational one. Moreover, Thayse Lima connects the efforts of regional integration to the process of internationalization of Latin American literature in the phenomenon known as the “Boom”. In the intellectual field, she argues, integration was also related to a desire to influence the regime of international circulation, which largely happened in the centre-periphery axis. Latin Americanist critics helped to shape a unified view of the continent’s cultural production, while also creating opportunities for the promotion and circulation of Latin American literature within the region. In addition to contributing to a greater understanding of the complex history of Brazil's insertion in Latin America, the book also sheds light on the strategies used by marginalized intellectual traditions to negotiate and imagine their place in a global sphere.

Barcelona: Anthropos, 1994. 463 p. ISBN 84-7658-438-5