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Mauro Resmini

Mauro Resmini headshot in front of a garden

Assistant Professor, School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures
Assistant Professor, Italian
Assistant Professor, Cinema and Media Studies

4103 Jiménez Hall
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Research Expertise

Film studies
Italy
politics

Mauro Resmini received his Ph.D. from the Departments of Italian Studies and Modern Culture and Media at Brown University in 2014. He is the author of a monograph on the work of Steven Spielberg (Il Castoro Cinema, 2014) and has published essays on Italian and European cinema and media, psychoanalysis, and critical theory. He is currently finishing a manuscript titled Figures of the Impasse: Italian Political Cinema and the Long '68, under contract with University of Minnesota Press.

Books

Steven Spielberg (Editrice Il Castoro, 2014) (in Italian).

Articles

  • “Periodizing Drama: Appunti su The Deuce,” in La grande Storia e il piccolo schermo, Andrea Bellavita, ed. (Milan: Mimesis, forthcoming in 2022) (in Italian).
  • “The Worker as Figure: On Elio Petri’s The Working Class Goes to Heaven,” Diacritics Vol. 46, No. 4 (2019).
  • “Asymmetries of Desire: Salò or the 120 Days of Sodom,” in The Unwatchable, Maggie Hennefeld et al., eds. (New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 2019).
  • “Obscurity, Anthologized: Non-Relation and Enjoyment in Love and Anger (1969),” in 1968 and Global Cinema, Christina Gerhardt and Sara Saljoughi, eds. (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2018).
  • “‘What Does It Mean to Be a Communist Today?’ Nanni Moretti’s Palombella rossa and La cosa as Essay Films,” in The Essay Film: Dialogue, Politics, Utopia, Caroline Eades and Elizabeth Papazian, eds. (New York: Wallflower – Columbia University Press, 2016).
  • “‘Il Senso dell’intreccio’: History, Totality, and Collective Agency in Romanzo Criminale,’ The Italianist Vol. 36, No. 2 (Fall 2016).“Re-Framing the New French Extremity: Cinema, Theory, Mediation,” Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies 90, Vol. 30, No. 3 (December 2015), 161-187.
  • “The Italian Turn. A Certain Tendency in Contemporary Psychoanalytic Aesthetics,” American Imago 70, No. 2 (Summer 2013), 271-297.

Teaching

  • ITAL436/FILM441 Italian Cinema I
  • ITAL473/FILM431 Italian Cinema II
  • ITAL499J/FILM429J Terrorism and Political Violence in Italy
  • FILM245 Film Form and Culture
  • FILM302 History of Cinema: The Sound Era
  • FILM319D The Geopolitics of Contemporary Storytelling
  • FILM329R The Mafia: From Corleone to Hollywood
  • FILM369A Post-war Film Theory
  • CMLT679I/FREN699C/GERM689C/SLLC698C

Publications

What Does It Mean Today to Be a Communist?’ Nanni Moretti’s Palombella rossa and La cosa as Essay Films

With its increasing presence in a continuously evolving media environment, the essay film as a visual form raises new questions about the construction of the subject, its relationship to the world, and the aesthetic possibilities of cinema.

School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Lead: Mauro Resmini
Dates:

With its increasing presence in a continuously evolving media environment, the essay film as a visual form raises new questions about the construction of the subject, its relationship to the world, and the aesthetic possibilities of cinema. In this volume, authors specializing in various national cinemas (Cuban, French, German, Israeli, Italian, Lebanese, Polish, Russian, American) and critical approaches (historical, aesthetic, postcolonial, feminist, philosophical) explore the essay film and its consequences for the theory of cinema while building on and challenging existing theories. Taking as a guiding principle the essay form's dialogic, fluid nature, the volume examines the potential of the essayistic to question, investigate, and reflect on all forms of cinema—fiction film, popular cinema, and documentary, video installation, and digital essay. A wide range of filmmakers are covered, from Dziga Vertov (Man with a Movie Camera, 1928), Chris Marker (Description of a Struggle, 1960), Nicolás Guillén Landrián (Coffea Arábiga, 1968), Pier Paolo Pasolini (Notes for an African Oresteia, 1969), Chantal Akerman (News from Home, 1976) and Jean-Luc Godard (Notre musique, 2004) to Nanni Moretti (Palombella Rossa, 1989), Mohammed Soueid (Civil War, 2002), Claire Denis (L'Intrus, 2004) and Terrence Malick (The Tree of Life, 2011), among others. The volume argues that the essayistic in film—as process, as experience, as experiment—opens the road to key issues faced by the individual in relation to the collective, but can also lead to its own subversion, as a form of dialectical thought that gravitates towards crisis.

Obscurity, Anthologized: Non-Relation and Enjoyment in Love and Anger (1969)

1968 and Global Cinema addresses a notable gap in film studies. The essays in this volume cover a breadth of cinematic movements that were part of the era's radical politics and independence movements.

School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Lead: Mauro Resmini
Non-ARHU Contributor(s): Edited By Christina Gerhardt and Sara Saljoughi
Dates:

1968 and Global Cinema addresses a notable gap in film studies. Although scholarship exists on the late 1950s and 1960s New Wave films, research that puts cinemas on 1968 into dialogue with one another across national boundaries is surprisingly lacking. Only in recent years have histories of 1968 begun to consider the interplay among social movements globally. The essays in this volume, edited by Christina Gerhardt and Sara Saljoughi, cover a breadth of cinematic movements that were part of the era's radical politics and independence movements. Focusing on history, aesthetics, and politics, each contribution illuminates conventional understandings of the relationship of cinema to the events of 1968, or "the long Sixties."