- List View
S M T W T F S
 
 
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
 
14
 
15
 
16
 
17
 
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
 
22
 
23
 
24
 
25
 
26
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
30
 
31
 
 

German Autumn: A Swedish Perspective on Post-War Germany

Printer-friendly version
Germany in 1946
Jimenez Hall 2125
Wednesday, December 03, 2014 - 3:30 PM to 5:00 PM

The Department of Germanic Studies invites you to the guest lecture, "German Autumn," by Lo Dagerman on Wednesday, December 3rd, 3.30pm, JMZ 2125

In 1946 there was large-scale destruction of German cities and enormous suffering among civilians. After what Germany had done, why should anyone care? Stig Dagerman, a 23-year-old, left-radical Swedish journalist went to see for himself what was happening to Germany and the Germans in those early post-war years, and he wrote a series of articles from his visit there during  the long, cold autumn of 1946. His articles were later collected in German Autumn, a book that became a classic.

German Autumn is a window into the two-year period between the defeat of Nazi Germany and the large-scale investment in Germany’s recovery by its former European and American enemies. In his articles that became German Autumn, Dagerman explores with empathy, in shrewd political analysis and extraordinary prose, the paralysis of collective guilt as well as individual suffering.

Lo Dagerman, daughter of Stig Dagerman and actress Anita Björk, will talk about why her father decided to tell this extraordinary story. She has lived in the United States for more than 30 years and has Master degrees from MIT and Johns Hopkins. Most recently, Lo Dagerman has worked as a school counselor in the Washington D.C. area. She is a driving force in the effort to introduce Stig Dagerman’s writings to an American audience.

 

(Photo: The Telegraph/Getty Images)