- List View
S M T W T F S
 
 
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
 
14
 
15
 
16
 
17
 
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
 
22
 
23
 
24
 
25
 
26
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
30
 
31
 
 

Resituating Nagasaki in Time and Place

Printer-friendly version
Pyon Su Room, Stamp Student Union
Monday, April 13, 2015 - 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM
Three dynamic scholars speak on the complicated and overlooked legacy of the U.S. atomic bombing of Nagasaki. Looking at the past, Drs. Diehl and Takemine illuminate the challenges of reconstruction and the creation of testimony organizations. Dr. Jackson compares representations of Nagasaki and Fukushima in manga, reflecting on how this history connects to our present.

Chad R. Diehl is Assistant Professor of History and Coordinator for the Asian Studies Minor Program at Loyola University Maryland. He received his Ph.D. in East Asian Studies from Columbia University and his B.A. in History from Montana State University. Chad teaches broadly on East Asian history, including courses on memory, modernity, and film in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. His publications include "Envisioning Nagasaki: From 'Atomic Wasteland' to 'International Cultural City,' 1945-1950,Urban History 41, no. 3 (August 2014): 497-516, and And the River Flowed as a Raft of Corpses: The Poetry of Yamaguchi Tsutomu, Survivor of both Hiroshima and Nagasaki (New York: Excogitating Over Coffee Publishing, 2010), which he edited and translated. In addition to issues of war in history and memory, his research interests include the history of subcultures in Japan, especially tattooing, and of twentieth-century Vietnam, especially Japan-Vietnam relations, 1940s-1960s. He is currently completing a book manuscript on the history of Nagasaki, exploring the relationship between reconstruction, religion, and memory politics in the formation of atomic memory in Japan in the years following the atomic bombings of August 1945. 

Terrance Jackson is associate professor of History at Adrian College. He holds a B.A. and B.S., cum laude, from Tufts University and a M.A. and Ph.D. from Indiana University. Dr. Jackson specializes in Japanese History. He has studied topics as diverse as the history of science in 19th century Japan and the portrayal of the atomic bombs in comic books. His most recent research investigates the impact of modern medicine on Japanese women.

Sei’ichiro Takemine is a professor at Meisei University in Tokyo

 

This event is Sponsored by the Japanese Program of the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures and the Center for East Asian Studies, with generous support from the Northeast Asia Council